Union General John A. Logan Card Signed

PRICE…$125

Signed in ink “John A. Logan, Illinois”. Measures 3.25 X 2. Overall very fine. Nice clear signature and ideal for framing. Along with it is an original engraving of the General. Could be a nice pair together under glass!

About: 

U.S. Representative Logan fought at Bull Run as an unattached volunteer in a Michigan regiment, and then returned to Washington where, before he would resign his congressional seat on April 2, 1862, he had entered the Union Army as Colonel of the 31st Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment, which he organized. He was known by his soldiers as “Black Jack”[3] because of his black eyes and hair and swarthy complexion, and was regarded as one of the most able officers to enter the army from civilian life.

Before resigning his seat, Union Army Colonel Logan served in the army of Ulysses S. Grant in the Western Theater and was present at the Battle of Belmont on November 7, 1861, where his horse was killed, and at Fort Donelson, where he was wounded on February 15, 1862. Soon after the victory at Donelson, he resigned his seat on April 2, 1862 and was promoted to brigadier general in the volunteers, as of March 21, 1862. Major John Hotaling served as his chief of staff. To confuse matters, the 32nd Illinois was commanded at Shiloh by a different Colonel John Logan. During the Siege of Corinth, John A. Logan commanded first a brigade and then the 1st Division of the Army of the Tennessee. In the spring of 1863, he was promoted to major general to rank from November 29, 1862.

In Grant’s Vicksburg Campaign, Logan commanded the 3rd Division of James B. McPherson’s XVII Corps, which was the first to enter the city of Vicksburg in July 1863 after its capture. Logan then served as the city’s military governor. In November 1863 he succeeded William Tecumseh Sherman in command of the XV Corps; and at the Battle of Atlanta (July 22, 1864), after the death of James B. McPherson during the day, he assumed command of the Army of the Tennessee. He was relieved a short time afterward by Oliver O. Howard. He returned to Illinois for the 1864 elections but rejoined the army afterward and commanded his XV corps in Sherman’s Carolinas Campaign.

In December 1864, Grant became impatient with George H. Thomas’s unwillingness to attack immediately at Nashville and sent Logan to relieve him. Logan was stopped in Louisville when news came that Thomas had completely smashed John Bell Hood’s Confederate army in the Battle of Nashville.

Logan had been disappointed when Howard was given permanent command of the Army of the Tennessee after McPherson’s death, and Sherman arranged for Logan to lead the army during the May 1865 Grand Review in Washington.

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